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*Warning: graphic content* Meet Gobbler, one of our newest patients that strande…

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*Warning: graphic content*
Meet Gobbler, one of our newest patients that stranded on Thanksgiving. Gobbler, a juvenile green sea turtle, came in with a very severe injury on his shell caused by a boat propeller. As you scroll through the photos, you will see what he looked like when he first came in, after the wound was cleaned out, and what he looks like currently all bandaged up in his tank.
Gobbler is a great reminder of why boating safety is important. Sea turtles can swim at bursts of speeds up to 25 miles per hour, but are often no match for an oncoming boat. Sick and injured sea turtles float and are unable to dive down to escape a boat strike. Sea turtles have to come to the surface to breathe, so when boating, keep your eyes open, stay alert, and always follow channel markers. Following the speed limit is a great way to ensure you’re able to spot a sea turtle before ending up on top of it.

Gobbler is currently getting treated with antibiotics, fluids, cold laser therapy, and daily bandage changes. He will graduate to a deeper tank once the wound has had some time to heal. Gobbler is on track to make a full recovery!

If you do see an injured or floating turtle, please call us at 956-761-4511.

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Founded in 1977 by Ila Fox Loetscher, we achieve our mission through donations and grants. Rehabilitate, Educate and Conserve!

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